Grand-Prix Attack in the Sicilian Defence – the Middlegame Plan Question

A few weeks ago I played an active chess tournament. I like this kind of tournaments because of several reasons. I play a lot of games within a day with reasonable time to think about moves (about 25 minutes per game usually) and I can test some of variants or openings against real players over the board.

And from this testing is the following game.

I was White and I played Grand-Prix Attack in Sicilian Defence which is characterized by moves 1.e4 c5 2.f4. Actually, I play it with a bit different order of moves – 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 and then 3.f4. The reason is to avoid the variant 1.e4 c5 2.f4 d5, where  Black has quite active play.

When you try new openings or schemes, then many times you do not know the typical plans in positions which are new for you. And exactly this was my case in the game.

After 15 moves we reached the position on the diagram here (White to move) and I had no idea what to play in my next moves. What plan should I choose now?

I did not like neither the Black knight on d4 square nor the dark-squared bishop :) I wanted to attack on the king’s side, but I was not able to find the right plan. Kh1, Rg1, Raf1, Bh3 was tooooo slow…

Playing exf5 led only to Nexf5 with very good place for this knight.

Of course,  there is nothing to play on the queen’s side :)

So I started to be focused on the center of board. And… I decided for some complications after moving my pawn to e5.

What plan would you choose in the situation on diagram and why? 

Here is the full game:



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2 Responses to “Grand-Prix Attack in the Sicilian Defence – the Middlegame Plan Question”

  1. Kevin says:

    What about a3 and b4 with the idea of breaking up black’s control of the center? For example, if you can trade pawns on c5, that opens up e5 for the white knight. Or if black trades pawns on b4, it weakens his control of d4.

  2. petrs says:

    That is a good idea, Kevin. But what if black plays a5 to prevent the move b4?

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